Tag Archives: Anglo-Saxons

Family Connections: Wulf, Wine and Thor

The last in the series of Late Saxon Wills: 1: Wulfgyth of Karletune 2: Ketel Alder 3: Edwin of Meltuna 4: Family Connections: Wulf, Wine and Thor The Will of Thurstan, son of Lustwine Potential Connections Whilst researching the Late … Continue reading

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Edwin of Meltuna

The third of the Late Saxon Will composed by Wulfgyth’s East Anglian family: 1: Wulfgyth of Karletune 2: Ketel Alder 3: Edwin of Meltuna 4: Family Connections: Wulf, Wine and Thor Edwin of Meltuna Brother by-blood or in-law? There is … Continue reading

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Ketel Alder

Continuing the four-post series, a look at three related Late Saxon Wills 1: Wulfgyth of Karletune 2: Ketel Alder 3: Edwin of Meltuna 4: Family Connections: Wulf, Wine and Thor Ketel, King’s Thegn? Despite Ketel had the requisite hidage, and … Continue reading

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Wulfgyth of Karletuna

A little bit of history . . . I intended to cover the three related Late Saxon Wills in one post. Ha! I laugh myself silly. After the first two wills the word count already was far too high. Could … Continue reading

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Enter The Scribes

Ancestral Lands: Part Two, Saxons and Danes Saxlingham wasn’t named for the Saxons, but for a minor lord by name of Seaxe. And despite the claims of the village sign, Seaxe probably lived one, even two centuries earlier (650-750 CE), … Continue reading

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A Hundred Walks

No, not 100 walks, but walks across, around and through an English hundred. This is something I began last summer, source of the flower photos I posted (see also The Confusing Case of the Norman Arches), and intend to resume … Continue reading

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Shall We Meet On The Hilltop

‘Shall we meet on the hilltop, where the four roads meet…’ So sang Marianne Faithful in The Witches Song on her 1979 album, Broken English. The song wasn’t of witches but of the women’s protest community at Greenham Common. And this post … Continue reading

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