Crimson’s Creative Challenge #8

cracked church window

CCC8

Welcome to my weekly challenge—open to all—just for FUN, FUN, FUN

Here’s how it works:

Every Wednesday I post a photo (this week it’s that one above.)
You respond with something CREATIVE

Here are some suggestions:

  • An answering photo
  • A cartoon
  • A joke
  • A caption
  • An anecdote
  • A short story (flash fiction)
  • A poem
  • A newly minted proverb, adage or saying
  • An essay
  • A song—the lyrics or the performance

You have plenty of scope, and only two criteria:

  • Your creative offering is indeed yours
  • Your writing is kept to 150 words or less

If you link your post to this post I’ll be able to find it
If you include Crimson’s Creative Challenge as a heading, WP Search will find it (theory)
If you tag it #CCC others should be able to find it by ‘Searching’ in the WP Reader (fingers crossed)

Here’s wishing you inspirational explosions. And FUN.

Details of the photo are given, if relevant, below this line


East window in ruined church at South Burlingham (between Norwich and Great Yarmouth)

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About crimsonprose

Spinner of Asaric and Mythic tales
This entry was posted in Crimson's Creative Challenge, Photos and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

88 Responses to Crimson’s Creative Challenge #8

  1. The Haunted Wordsmith says:

    The view never changed until the boy became a man.

    Liked by 3 people

  2. Lynn Love says:

    Lovely image – where is it? Have scheduled mine for Friday

    Liked by 1 person

    • crimsonprose says:

      I have explained it right at the bottom. It’s the abandoned, ruined east church window of an old church. But I managed to catch it so you can see through to the interrior and out the far end, the usual west tower absent.

      Liked by 1 person

    • crimsonprose says:

      Sorry, misunderstood question. Currently have screwy eyes, migraine approaching, have taken tabs, hope I’m in time. Meantime, weird kind of vision.
      Where, right. It’s St Peter’s Church at North Burlingham which is on the A47 our of Norwich on road to Great Yarmouth, close to Acle. No bus stop. I had to walk it cross country from Aclo. Buy worth it; so many times seen from the bus. Great to see it up close. You’ll find another photo of it in Pick of the Pics, I thnk it’s the second or third photo, with a link to the original with more info about the church.
      Soorry if I’ve missed words. everything’s blurry at the moment.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        Great Gothic imagery. Very MR James! Sorry you’re feeling so rough. Hope you caught it in time

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        The visuals seldom last more than 20 minutes, and usually allow me time to pop the tabs. Plus, they’re very infrequent these days (time was it was almost daily). And though the visuals can make you feel queasy, disoriented, bloody annoyed, I don’t feel rough (at least, not yet!).

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        Hideous things. I have a friend who has them regularly and they wipe her out for a day at a time at least. Fingers crossed you caught it in time

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Yea. One learns. Also I take tablets that usually prevent them, or at least lessen the severity. But I’m still careful to avoid triggers. Such as people perfumes and makeup (not easuly avoided, but I try.) I think today I forgor to take the tabs at lunchtime, and paid for my forgetfulness. Ne’er mind, eh. Others het things a whole lot worse. 🙂 My sympathies to your friend. Tell her, Clonidine, only available on prescription, and she’ll probably need maximum dose (6 tabs a day). But it works.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        I think her triggers are coffee and hormones – not a lot she can do to avoid the last one till she’s through the menopause! I’ll try to let her know, thanks. Stay well

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Ta muchly.
        Much of mine was hormone-driven. But the day comes … I was presecribed the clonidine to counter the nasty flushes. Only to discover, when I tried to come off it, that is prevented migraines as well. I should have known. I’d had it prescribed 5 centuries ago, when the migraines were at their worst (in my 20s — the Pill, I believe) but hadn’t known at the time that I needed toi take it at maximun dosage. We live. We learn. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        I’m so glad you found something that works for you. I’ve only had a couple in my life – when I was a teenager – and found them debilitating. Do they know exactly why they happen? Be interesting to know the science behind them

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Wow, at one time I could have reelled it off, complete with biochemical names.
        I know the pain is caused by the tighteing of blood vessels. Also, oneo f teh brain chemicals is involved (dopamine, I think). That chemical used to have me happy-hyper about an hour before the attack. And I never could suss whether it was cause or symptom. Apparently it’s symptom. But more than that I don’t remember.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        Sounds like complex chemistry alright. Perhaps people with narrower blood vessels are pre disposed to them? Good in a way that there are these pre warnings, as I believe there are with epilepsy and diabetic fits.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Good as long as you recognise it as such. Next warning, with me, are the visual disturbances. But by then it could be hitting the digestuve system — which goes into a rhythmic wave of squeezing and relaxing. End result: nausea. If it persists (which by then it usually does) the intestinal tract goes into eruption-mode. All orifices. And then saliva mega-produces, phelgm, mucus, tears, everything flows. Safest place then is the bathroom! And that’s not to mention the headache. Over the years I learned to ‘go with it’. Just ride it, like givingbirth. The more you clench against it, the more painful it gets. But it takes years to learn how best to cope. And everybody has it slightly different. Years ago, when the children were young, I would save the ironing until I had a migraine. The monotony mindless activity helped me relax and ride through it.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        Wow, it really does hit every part of you, doesn’t it? I can see that about the pain. They do say to relax into pain makes the pain better than if you tense. As you say, not easy to do though. Mindset, as is so often the case, is so important in these things.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        All body-over. And that’s before you get some of the odder symptoms. A feeling of one half of the body being much bigger than the other; a sense of disorientation: just two of the odd ones. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        Your body feeling different sizes is very odd – I wonder what causes that? Thank goodness for medication. How on earth did people cope before.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Lay still in a darkened room, was the standard recommendation. Although Queen Victoria smoked cannabis for relief. 🙂
        After many many years of not taking meds in time to catch it, I discovered it made no difference: take them early or forget it. So I many a migraine wirhout medication. I would open all windows (cos the triggers to migraine also triggered an asthma attack but I didn’t realise that, didn’t know I had asthma till fairly recently) but the fresh cold air helped the breathing. Then I’d wrap myself in a blanket and, bowl in hand, circle around the room. Round, and round, endlessly. The idea being to tire myself. And when tired, I’d flop on the bed. By then I wold have totally emptied my body of every liquid. Exhausted, I’d sleep.
        I was lucky, migraine seldom lasted more than 6 hours. Others suffer for days. I can’t imagine it.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        It’s so debilitating, so all consuming! Have you ever written about it?

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Nah. I wrote a blog about my experence wuth CFS?ME way back in 2014. But many others have focused on migraine. It’s pretty well understood these days.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        I was thinking as part of your fiction, really. A protagonist who has migraines

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Could do. Cos migraine isn’t a C20th problem. The Greeks named !. It’an idea. I thank you. Hey, perhaps I’ll use it for a Pegman’s story!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        I didn’t know that about the Greeks. Interesting it’s been recognised for so long, compared to many illness that have passed through history being muddled with others. It would make a good story, your poor protagonist suffering through, tormented by the pain.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        It has been suggested that the trepanned skulls dating to Neolitiic times were migraine treatments of the day. Amazing that, without metals, the ‘doctor’ could cut into the patient’s skull and recmove a small circular disk of bone, and the patient survived … at least long enough to develop scar tissue. Of course, equally possible, the op was done to allow the crazy demons to escape. We just don’t know. There’s also the thought that the nasty visuals one gets at the onset, being remarkably like those of a shaman entering trance, perhpas in primitive societies initiation into shamanism was the usual path of the migraine sufferer. It’s an idea.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        It’s a very interesting idea and quite possible I’d think. Wouldn’t be the only time medical conditions were seen as otherworldly – just been reading how epilepsy was seen as a link to the Gods in ancient Greece and Rome. And yes, I’d heard about trepanning in ancient times – still can’t quite get my head around someone without anaesthetic sitting still enough to have a hole ground in their skull … They made them tough in those days!

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Have you read up on medieval medicine? It rivals medieval pratcices of torture … not used on suspected traitors, but simply to get a witness statement for the most mundane of crimes. Incredible. We might thank whoever our chosen gods that we’ve come so far in relatively little time. Now we scream and hold up our hands in horrible at (relatively) minot infringements of human rights.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        How right you are. Any procedure before anaesthetics and antibiotics must have just been horrendous. I read about the 18th/19th century ‘cure’ for kidney stone in men – as far as I can make out, it just involved a very long pair of tweezers … No wonder so many of us were dead by our thirties, though of course those ‘average’ life expectancies were skewed by the high infant mortality rate. As you say, we worry about data mining and dodgy ads on Facebook – trying living in virtual police states where there was no freedom of expression or worship, where you were tied to land and landowners. We are fortunate indeed

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        I wonder if you have read Steven Pinker’s *The Better Angels of Our Nature*? If not, I think you’d … not say enjoy, but find it exceedingly interesting. He’s such a good writer.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        I haven’t, but after reading the reviews, now I really want to! I’d heard before that there’s scientific proof we are actually becoming less violent, there are fewer murders, the streets are safer and this sounds a wonderfully reassuring proof of that. Forgive me if I’ve recommended this to you before but have you read Hubbub: Filth, Noise and Stench in England 1600-1770 by Emily Cockayne. Just an absolutely fascinating study of how we dealt with our own rubbish and waste in the 17th/18th century. Sounds gross – and it is – but it’s never dull. Again, shows how lucky we are to live when we do

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        No, it doesn’t sound gross. It sounds fantastic. Right up my street, so to speak. And Steven Pinker provides loads of evidence, loads of graphs, everything referenced, and it makes for a stunning read.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        Looking forward to reading it – thanks so much for the recommendation 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        When it’s a good read, I like to spread the word. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        You ought to be on commission 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        I doubt I’d earn much. I might promote it, but for many people its conclusions negate their strongly held beliefs. The Golden Age is past, we’re descending into hell. Or didn’t you know? I see few optimists, at least not amongst those who are given to think. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        Well, everyone needs to talk to a historian or two! You and I both know through studying the past how routinely violent, nasty and unpleasant people have been to each other. Trial by ordeal, capital and corporal punishment, regional wars, local conflicts … Much of this – at least in parts of the world – has all but vanished. People need to study more, rather than reading the tabloid headlines.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        You put me in mind of my father’s conversation last week on the phone. At a loss of what to read (he’s 99 this year) he turned to some of my mother’s books. And, gosh, the author’s name has escaped me. Anyway, cradle-to-grave, family sagas, many of which have been dramatised. Now I know you know who I mean. Anyway, he was astounded at how badly people used to treat each other; the abuse of children particularly. Yet he’s no fool, I think he’s forgotten what life was like when he was a kid. And did he really believe Dickens made it up? Note, he has been an avid reader all his life, and he doesn’t have any noticeab;e mental health problems.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        Catherine Cookson, maybe? She was one of my mum’s favourites, too years ago. Her books are full of mistreated heroines who battle through in the end. I think we do forget how badly people have been treated, how few rights most of us had until recent times. Teachers were still routinely beating kids when I was at school, a fact my 14 year old son finds shocking. You dad must have seen some changes.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        That’s the one., Totally lost it. Yea, he’s seen some changes, but I think also he blanks a lot. While he’s physically and mentally able, there seems a tiredness about him. He doesn’t want to cope with any more changes, and one way to make them seem less is to forget them. Home-grown psychology here. 🙂
        And yea, I remember boys getting the cane, and one teacher which a penchant for throwing the board rubber.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        I can understand where your dad’s coming from. If I ever get to that age, the world will tire me out too, I’m sure! Ah, board rubbers – they use interactive white boards and Power Point now 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Yea, devil of a job to throw one of those! Have to make sure you’ve powered off first!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        I ordered a copy! On it’s way from Blackwell’s now 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Brilliant. And don’t be put off by the bulky tome. He provides tons of references. Everything he argues is thoroughly, thoroughly, backed by evidence/

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        Really looking forward to reading it. A strange mix of a grim subject with a positive conclusion.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Yea, one way to look at it. But unfortunately it’s message is slow getting through to those disasterists who continue to wave their flags and wail of our diminishing ethics, clearly a sign of our imminent self-anhilation!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        Sadly the human race is intent on self annihilation, even if the murder rate is dropping and our streets are safer, but that’s more due to greed and complacency and there being too many of us. We love our cars and our ‘stuff’, don’t we?

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        But we’ve always loved our ‘stuff’, except for the small religious few. It’s only the nature of stuff that changes. And while we abhor human pollution, one asks which is worst, the pollutors, and the pollutants. I believe the planet is fully able to fend for itself. Probably by getting rid of us!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        Oh, I totally agree with you – you only need to look at an old cesspit or spoil heap to know we’ve always loved stuff. It’s just there are too many of us now, flooding up the place. And I also agree – dear old Mother Earth has outlived global extinctions before and she’ll outlive this one. Life will endure, though I doubt we will. Still, the thought of the green, blue ball still spinning fills me with hope

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Survival of the fittest. Well, I’ve had my day. I waved my banners, laid down to stop the tractors, got all uppity and got all blood pressured. Now … it’s there in my writing, in praise of the earth, it’s there within me, seeping out to wash over others (I hope). More? Nah. I doubt I can do.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        We can all only do our best, our little part to make the world better and your love of nature and the planet shines through your writing. as for us, I’m proud we have eco energy, that we don’t drive, that we’ve hardly ever flown – it sounds like we’ve restricted ourselves and undoubtedly we have, but I hate the air of entitlement so many have, those who moan if they haven’t gone abroad this year. Well, boo bloody hoo. Travelling abroad is amazing, but we’re not entitled to it, as we’re not entitled to new phones every year, new cars, new clothing. Stay home and live a smaller life – a bit less desiring what we don’t have, a bit more hygge

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Myself, I live at a frugal level. By choice. And I’ve never driven; a danger on the roads when subject to migraines and the first sign is objects disappearing from the field of view. I either walk or take public transport wherever I go. And if more people did the same there’d be less traffic and less pollution. As to the need to travel abroad (okay, my brother does it, but that’s for business), there are so many beautiful places in the UK, why go through all that airport rigmarole. And perhaps our own holiday indusry might then recover, with accompanying reduction in unemployment figures. But, I hear the call, can we guarantee the weather? What weather? Have you seen what the Med is getting right now?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        But as you say, if everyone took a small amount of collective responsibility, how much better would the world be? I quite fancy trying to see some seals up off Scotland for a big birthday this year – no point worrying about the weather there 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        I wish you well with that. We sometimes get them off our beach, or at the right time of year you can take a boat trip out to Scroby. If you don’t mind 30+ windturbines all whumping overhead. And if the tide’s right.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        It’d be a hit and miss thing, wouldn’t it? Would love to see the Northern Lights too, but would have the same problem. And I’m not prepared to move to the Land of the Midnight Sun to guarantee a front row seat 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Yea, I’d love to see too. I don’t even get to see shooting stars, Once, in an entire lifetime!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        We’ve seen a few meteor showers here, though my stamina for standing outside in the cold with my neck back is pretty poor! There is a thrill to them though. And seeing the Moon and planets through husband’s telescope is special too

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        I decided to take photos of the recent full moon. I knew I wouldn’t get the Blood Moon. By the time that happened there’d be too many houses in the way, and in the wee hours of the morning I wasn’t going to go traipsing across the marshes to get a good view. So I clicked and clicked as the moon was rising, looking largely huge to me.
        Result. 30 photos of a bright white spot in plain black sky! Ho-hum. I tried.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        Dammit! So hard to capture these things, I know. All those shots of gorgeous Moons across the world – totally overcast here!

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        We’ve mostly had overcast skies. But then … wow! Let’s snap.
        I don’t mind that I missed yet another *not to be missed* Blood Moon. I did see one back in … er … 2010 maybe? I just happened to be coming home from a friends in the wee hours when … lo! There it was. Folks must have wondered what I was about. Standing in the road, gazing upwards. It was pretty stunning. And it forms part of what happens in Asaric Book Four.
        Never waste an experience. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        I love that, weaving such a lovely experience into your work, that magpie mind that informs us all and how we work.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Nothing ever wasted, hey. Every experience set to good/vreative use. And I’ve seen that you do the same. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        I do, indeed, steal from everywhere – even some unpleasant/traumatic experiences have their uses, let you know how scared, lost, empty people can feel in certain situations. Graham Greene said there was a ‘splinter of ice’ in the heart of every writer and although that sounds a bit harsh, he had a point.

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        I do know what you mean by that. Dispassionate, detached, able to observe, understand, without being emotionally disturbed.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        Storing things away, thinking ‘ooh, that will be useful’. I haven’t based any shorts directly on upsetting moments in my life, but I’ve certainly drawn on them. ‘Liars and thieves’, we are 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        Some things become woven into a story. And in their weaving, lose some of their bite, 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        Very true. I’m cautious about using my own experiences too closely. I watched a documentary about Hanif Kureishi and how much he hurt his ex wife when he wrote a book about a man who had multiple affairs. ‘Truth’ in fiction is one thing – being thoughtless and cold is another

        Liked by 1 person

      • crimsonprose says:

        In full agreement there.
        Also, I’ve read biographies where every word of a writer’s fictiona; story has been analysed to reveal a life I’m sure the writer never intended to make public.
        One must evercise caution, and remain aware of what others might make of any ‘included’ incident.

        Like

  3. Violet Lentz says:

    I posted a comment and a link this morning, but I don’t see it here. I said ‘if it’s got bars on it, it says jail to me.’ That’s where this took me immediately, but it also says stuck in between freedom and being enslaved…. Excellent choice of prompts.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Arch without door,
    Window without pane,
    If only people could be so open,
    We’d have so much less pain.

    Liked by 4 people

  5. Pingback: Crimson’s Creative Challenge | Photo Prompt – Table for One

  6. Karen Craven says:

    Not sure if I did this right! Thanks for the prompt. I really like it; http://tablefor1.blog/2019/01/03/crimsons-creative-challenge-photo-prompt/

    Liked by 1 person

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  8. Thanks for yet another brilliant prompt! Here goes my take on it:
    https://blogternator.com/2019/01/04/the-intact-the-broken/

    Liked by 1 person

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